Darawank

tuncurry dunes and heath

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The Darawank or Darawakh area is located between Hallidays Point and Tuncurry, approximately 7 km north of Tuncurry. The name "Darawakh" is believed to be an aboriginal word meaning Dark Waters.

Darawank Nature Reserve was reserved on 5 March 1999 and was originally 1191 hectares in size. It is located approximately seven kilometers north of Forster and about 1 kilometer south of the village of Hallidays Point and adjoins Nine Mile Beach to the east and Diamond Reef Beach in the north. The eastern boundary of the reserve is the mean low water mark and so the reserve includes the intertidal zone of the beach. Please click on the following link to the Statement of Management Intent for the Reserve which contains a map and additional information.

Recent acquisitions (approximately 1000 ha) to the reserve to the west include part of the Darawakh Wetlands and Frogalla Swamp catchment's, formed by the tributaries of Wallamba River and Darawank/Darawakh Creek. The western sections of the reserve include areas rehabilitated by infilling drainage canals and removing other waterway infrastructure with the specific intent to manage runoff from acid sulfate soils impacting on the water quality of Wallamba River. There was a Management Plan adopted for these areas by Local Council in August 2003, but this only deals with the rehabilitation of the site. Some of the vegetation communities occurring in these wetlands include Flooded Gum Forest, Swamp Oak Swamp Forest, Sedgeland Swamp, Freshwater Meadow, Rushland, Open Water etc

While as noted above, there is a 'Statement of Management Intent' for the reserve there is to my knowledge, no actual Management Plan or works being undertaken or planned in original part of the reserve. It is a mix of a totally out of balance Banksia serrata Dry Sclerophyll Shrubland and Eucalyptus pilularis Dry Sclerophyll Forest. There is a lot of disturbance combined with regular bush fires which has encouraged the proliferation of Banksia serrata to a point where, in some areas it has become a mono culture.

Species of interest are Asperula asthenes (a threatened species), Marsdenia liisae and Utricularia gibba.

Chiloglottis diphylla, Asperula asthenes, Taurantha ophioglossa